Eleventh Dream Day

Special Hideout Series

Eleventh Dream Day

Jaye Jayle

Sun, April 20, 2014

8:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10.00

Tickets at the Door

Eleventh Dream Day
Eleventh Dream Day
Since first hitting the road in a battered Econoline van in the 1980s, Eleventh Dream Day continues to build on their history by moving forward musically,while never forgetting what inspired them. On Works For Tomorrow, core band members Rick
Rizzo, Janet Beveridge Bean, Mark Greenberg, and Douglas McCombs are joined by James Elkington (Brokeback, Tweedy), marking the first time the band has recorded with a second guitarist since 1994. Elkington’s addition has unleashed the band’s strengths. The ferocious and visceral interplay between Rizzo and Elkington charge the band with a joyous exuberance that sweeps the listener in for the 43 minutes of Works For Tomorrow. The album also features performances by long time friend Martin Wenk (Calexico) and Chicago stalwart Rich Parenti on horns.

Eleventh Dream Day is known for their raw, inexhaustible live performances. They honed the songs on Works For Tomorrow during an extended residency at Chicago’s Hideout Club, and the packed, sweaty energy of those shows is unmistakable on this new recording. Drummer and sometime lead vocalist Janet Beveridge Bean breaks free as never before, her vocals igniting the songs with an animalistic urgency, as she furiously propels the songs with pure command from behind the kit. Works For Tomorrow was recorded and mixed by Greenberg at the Loft (Wilco’s studio) and Mayfair Recordings. The 10 tracks on the album center on embracing a future which does not succumb to the past, but challenges it in order to adapt and grow. This reframing and understanding of history is keenly stated in the album’s title track when Rizzo sings, “You see her, this must be the beginning or the end of whatever that was.”

“Vanishing Point,” the album’s opening track sets the tone with its brute force and driving rhythm. Written by Bean while on long distance runs, the song captures the thrill she feels on a motorbike as she takes that perfect line through the curve, setting her up for the burst of speed on the straightaway. The guttural urgency of Bean’s vocals on this track are counterpoised by a guitar tour de force. “Requiem For 4 Chambers” -- a clever song on the complexities of the human heart -- imagines the heart as a disembodied organism moving simultaneously toward destruction and light. From the reimagined, deliberate version of Judy Henske and Jerry Yester’s “Snowblind,” to the quieter, melodic tracks like “Deep Lakes,” Eleventh Dream Day’s fiery performances and inventive arrangements make for the most complex and compelling record of their career. Works For Tomorrow finds the band fixed on the road ahead, barreling toward the horizon with the radio turned up -- way, way up.
Jaye Jayle
Jaye Jayle
“Anyone who is using more than two chords is just showing off.”

Woodie Guthrie’s famous quote became a mantra for young musicians who rallied around folk’s austerity, and later inspired a new generation of artists who basked in punk’s primitivism. Guthrie’s songs may not be an influence on Louisville’s Jaye Jayle, but his call for simplicity as a deliberate choice versus a matter of mere ability resonated with the veterans of Kentucky’s dark indie scene. Naming themselves Jaye Jayle as a pen name or a pseudonym to veer away from a traditional band moniker, the group sought to eliminate unnecessary variables and deconstruct their compositions down to their most concentrated essence. Jaye Jayle owe less to our nation’s roots music and more to peripheral rock bands that have taken the “less is more” attitude to its furthest reaches. Imagine Spacemen 3 without the saturated wall of distortion, or Neu! without the upbeat motorik pulse, or Lungfish without the shamanistic howls. But these reference points seem either too bombastic or too lush. Perhaps a nexus of The Troggs’ ham-fisted drumming, Angels of Light’s ominous twang, and Suicide’s swaths of negative space hits closer to the mark, but even that doesn’t do the band justice. Jaye Jayle’s debut album House Cricks and Other Excuses To Get Out is an exercise in tension and restraint, a tightrope act between singer-songwriter traditions and art rock experimentation, and an intersection of Southern cultural permutations and otherworldly sounds.

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com