The 11th Annual SXSW Send Off Party

312unes Presents:

The 11th Annual SXSW Send Off Party

Dehd, Waco Brothers, Tatiana Hazel, Tasha, The Curls, Half Gringa, Good Fuck

Sat, March 9, 2019

4:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10 at the door

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The Annual SXSW Send Off Party
The Annual SXSW Send Off Party
Chicago bands headed to Austin for SXSW hit the stage for an all-day showcase with the proceeds going to their respective treks down to the lone star state.

4:00 p.m. - Half Gringa
5:00 p.m. - Tasha
6:00 p.m. - Tatiana Hazel
7:00 p.m. - Good Fuck
8:00 p.m. - The Curls
9:00 p.m. - Waco Brothers
10:00 p.m. - Dehd
Dehd
Dehd
Comprised of Ne-Hi’s Jason Balla on guitar, Emily Kempf of Heavy Dreams, VAIL, and recently opened Time Being Tattoo (congrats!!) on bass, and man around town Eric McGrady on a two piece drum kit, Dehd are Chicago's torchbearers of the loose, K-Records, indie rock sound made for people who really believe cassette tapes are the closest thing to reel-to-reel.
On tape Dehd lays down laid back Great Lakes surf rock jams -- Kempf and Balla trade verses about heartache, horses, sunshine, sunburn and all things rock and roll over McGrady’s simple and insistent drumming-- but live, the trio brings it to another level. In an interview with Pond Magazine, Balla describes his earliest musical experiences in a blink-182 cover band as “raw stupid energy and fun.” Anybody who has caught a Dehd live show, including sold out dates at the Hideout with Horse Lords and Bully, knows exactly what he’s talking about. Rather than playing it cool and settling into the “chill zone” their songs suggest, the band motions to the sound guy to turn up the monitors, and channels the punkish energy underpinning each track to make an electrifying live performance. McGrady, front and center, hammers away at his minimal kit, anchoring the music and the scenery as Kempf and Balla pinball around stage, taking turns shredding, singing, and dancing. Dehd has the unmistakable and exciting vibe of a group of friends intent on having fun and bringing the whole crowd with them.
Waco Brothers
Waco Brothers
The Waco Brothers have been standing at the corner of punk urgency and Three-Chords-And-The-Truth country for 20 years now. They started at a time when it was deemed patently absurd to mix the two types of music, but the Wacos knew the score; they are different sides of the same coin, the personal wrapped in the political. And instead of travelling calculated creative boulevards during their career, the Waco Brothers have explored dark alleys and winding gravel paths through nine releases, all with the headlights off and the pedal to the metal, worrying (or not worrying) about end results later. With a body of work known for the indelicate and raucous, this may be their most deliberate and punchy yet—no one’s more dangerous than a man with nothing to lose. The title can be read two different ways, after all.


The Waco Brothers have played SXSW every year since 1953 and can usually be found randomly colliding with each other onstage or at their office; Guero's on South Congress
Tatiana Hazel
Tatiana Hazel
Remezcla put it best when they crowned Tatiana Hazel, “Chicago’s Future Hometown Heroine.” She is the multidisciplinary, underground, do-it-all Diva Chicago never knew it needed. Her best songs drip with the confidence and swagger of a performer with twice the experience, but they never for a moment feel inauthentic. If starpower was convertible to horese power Hazel would be a Dodge Challenger Demon, revving it’s engines, waiting to engage the clutch and shoot to the head of the pack.
2018’s Brittney referencing Toxic EP showcase the full range of Hazel’s artistic abilities. She moves fluidly across languages and sounds, from the house-inflected pop of “Can’t Help” to the moody R&B vibe of “Love Rut,” linking them all with her beautiful voice that sounds as comfortable in snappy verses as it does in soaring choruses. On “Imma Be” a standout track from 2018’s Britney referencing Toxic, Hazel sings about living uninhibited and unconcerned with minor setbacks like job security because she is certain of her future success. In less talented hands this confidence may come across as inflated arrogance, but when the chorus hits and Hazel repeats “I know that I’m meant for bigger better things/I know what I’m going to be,” there is no doubt that she is telling the truth. It is not a flex, it is a mission statement; Hazel knows her potential, she is just waiting for the rest of us to catch up.
Tasha
Tasha
“We believers in softness here. Believe in imagination: the color pink. Believe in fuck the police poetry. Believe in our hearts as heaven. I believe in bathtime: I believe in bubbles on my nose and warm warm water. I believe in my bed--I love my bed. But sometimes I’m afraid if I die everybody will be too tired to remember my name, so I take care of my little body…”
Tasha opens her debut album, “Alone at Last” with these words, spoken softly but with conviction: this is not a proposal, but a declaration. The following 6 tracks affirm her commitment to the radical politics of living a gentle life in a chaotic time. Shimmering guitars and warm synth tones anchor her poetry as she mines those small moments of intimacy, hope, and shelter that directly engage with the faculty known as love.
“Alone at Last” moves at its own contemplative pace, unbothered by the bustle of daily life and all its stressors, offering the listener a Faraday cage of quiet bliss, a space for honesty.
Though universal in their application, these songs are for and from the young black women in Chicago fighting everyday to make this city a better place. Do not mistake the quiet for weakness. It is charged with possibility “All the softness makes her tough”
Tasha is offering nothing less than a blueprint for a new, kinder world.
The Curls
The Curls
The Curls claim to hail from Chicago but seem to mentally reside in outer space or perhaps the coconut tree-blood soaked hills of Hollyweird. The general consensus is that these people are total "wack-a-doodles" and must be "on something" to come up with this stuff. The group blends genres like health nuts blend smoothies!
Their music has been labeled as Psychedelic Pop, Art Rock, Nu-Angular Guitar, Piss Jazz, and even Hardcore Experimental Adult Contemporary Noise. The Harvard Crimson reported, "The Curls are a fun, nostalgic sextet whose genre fluidity necessitates a string of hyphenated descriptors—art-funk-jazz-psycho-punk-pop-rock doesn’t even cover all the bases."
An impressive and widely regarded performance at Pitchfork Music Festival 2018 has led to a growing and unstable fanbase. The Curls have shared stages with popular music greats like Tame Impala, Courtney Barnett, Maps and Atlases, Post Animal and Texas Fred. The group's 2017 self-released debut album SUPER UNIT received approval from legendary guitar rocker Adrian Belew (King Crimson, Talking Heads). Belew raved typing in all caps via Facebook Messenger, "I LIKE IT!"
Half Gringa
Half Gringa
Half Gringa is the songwriting project of Izzy Olive.
Gruñona was named one of Chicago Magazine’s 10 Best Chicago Albums This Year: “Few artists are cutting records with the intelligence of Izzy Olive, the avant-garde indie singer-songwriter who performs as Half Gringa. The Carbondale native’s brand of alternative folk, which incorporates chamber rock and jazz, is decidedly blunt in its lyrics and scope, tackling issues of class and violence in jarringly plain verse. Chicago has been a breeding ground for boundary-pushing female songwriters—from Liz Phair to Angel Olsen—and Gruñona has Olive primed for the same type of breakout.” —Britt Julious
Good Fuck
Good Fuck
Tim Kinsella and Jenny Pulse have consummated their love on disc. The result is Good Fuck, an erotic exploration of experimental literary techniques and adventurous electronic beats.

Seeking an intimate creative environment to develop their musical concepts, Kinsella and Pulse journeyed deep into isolation. “We packed the car and drove 13 hours to The Millay Colony in upstate New York: an artist’s colony in The Berkshires, miles down a private road, next to 100,000 acres of national forest,” Kinsella shares.

On arrival, the couple devised a unique artistic process to work from, Kinsella describes it as a “collaborative conscious alignment.” The most unique aspect of this creative method involves the writing of the album’s lyrics. “We agreed on 12 books we thought most relevant and came up with various systems to collapse and collage them into each other in different combinations,” Kinsella says. That list included titles ranging from Don Quixote to The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry. Drawing from this source material, Kinsella and Pulse employed a sort-of literary mash-up, scrambling content and structure into a thoroughly new product. “We might take the form of an Eskimo genesis myth, but use words from Anaïs Nin,” Kinsella explains.

“It wasn't a direct lifting of words from the book,” observes Pulse. “We were trying to blend all these different elements to create a new story. We were collaging ideas together from this collection of books we'd picked out.”

There’s audible chemistry in Good Fuck’s sound; Kinsella’s extensive history in genre-pushing rock and roll (Joan of Arc, Cap’n Jazz) is strikingly complimented by Pulse’s fresh ear for minimalist electro sounds. Pulse’s experience in electronic music production was essential in guiding the project. “Before I started dating Tim he sent me all these demos that he was working on,” Pulse recalls. “He said, 'Maybe we can do something with these?' I said, 'No, we need to do this completely from scratch.' “

Kinsella and Pulse achieved complete artistic symbiosis in composing Good Fuck’s music. “To a large degree we don't even know who programmed what beat, and who programmed what synth line,” Kinsella reflects.

Kinsella says he and Pulse were “stunned” by the results of their collaboration, but their process wasn’t perfect. “Of course there were snags, technological and psychological. And of course we threw a good amount away. But what was left was not the result of trying to write songs, but the effortless evidence of what merged when we got clear in our intentions and then just let it out,” Kinsella recalls.

But listeners won’t notice Kinsella’s perceived imperfections, the album’s eerie synth soundscapes and chanted vocals flow effortlessly from track to track. The music of Good Fuck melds the sensual with the cryptic, the erotic with the esoteric. Good Fuck reminds us that experimental music doesn’t necessarily need to be caustic or harsh, it can exist comfortably in the groove of a seductive electronic beat.
Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com