The Harmed Brothers

The Harmed Brothers

Ryan Joseph Anderson, Joybird

Wed, March 7, 2018

9:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10.00

The Harmed Brothers
The Harmed Brothers
Portland, Oregon "indiegrass" outfit the Harmed Brothers are an up-and-coming force within the 21st century American roots music scene.

The Harmed Brothers have been well known in many circles for their constant zigzagging up, down and all across these United States. The two songwriters, along with whatever band the whims of chance and good fortune may provide forever chasing what friend and songwriter Tom VandenAvond refers to as a "never-ending aching just to roam."

Their live performances have been referred to as "loud, sweaty, romantic affairs," emotional rollercoasters ranging from gentle and gorgeous to punk-spirited hootenanny free-for-alls.
Ryan Joseph Anderson
Ryan Joseph Anderson
Ryan Joseph Anderson is known as the bandleader for the beloved Chicago roots outfit Go Long Mule, guitar slinger for garage-rockers Rambos, and as a producer, sessions man, and touring musician for a variety of artists. His influences as a songwriter range from country blues to psychedelic rock. American Songwriter said Anderson "evokes the open-tunings of Nick Drake as well as the barroom howl of Tom Waits." His debut record "The Weaver's Broom", engineered and co-produced by Andrija Tokic (Alabama Shakes, Hooray for the Riff Raff), was released in April of 2014 and was hailed as one of the best Americana records of the year. His songs have been included on "best of" lists for Daytrotter, Songpickr, and featured in Paste. He is currently working on his sophomore release due out in 2017.
Joybird
Joybird
JOYBIRD is the musical project of Chicago-based multi-instrumentalist, Jess McIntosh. She has held many titles: fiddler, educator, songwriter, performer and tour mate, visual artist, continual student. With her debut album, Long Time Exhaling, she has also proven herself an accomplished storyteller.
The album, released in 2017, deals with the particular griefs of moving to another city, the end of a relationship, and the arduous process of rebuilding that both entail. While to fear change is only human, Jess’s music embraces the impermanence in life as something that leads to bigger knowledge, deeper growth. Rooted in the fiddle and banjo sounds of Appalachia, her stories speak of unfolding personal and communal strength, told in spare poetry like that of Lucinda Williams or Anais Mitchell. “Oak is a king, the acorn a man, but so many kings and never a plan when the wilt took rampant hold” (“Catalpa”).
Based in Chicago, Jess tours internationally with Al Scorch (Bloodshot Records), has shared the stage with notable artists Steve Earle, Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives, Gil Landry (Old Crow Medicine Show), co-founded local country outfit, Big Sadie, and frequently collaborates with members of Chicago’s Old Lazarus' Harp Folk Collective. Her original music has been featured in silent film series, How Do We Sing?, and Great Smoky Mountain Nat’l Park documentary, Horace Kephart: His Life and Legacy. She was composer/co-lyricist for the play The Revel, which debuted with the House Theater Company of Chicago in 2015, and returns yearly as ensemble violinist for The House’s annual production, The Nutcracker. She’s a teaching artist at Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, and staff artist at Augusta Heritage Center’s American Vernacular Dance Week (West Virginia), Miles of Music Camp (New Hampshire and Boston), and Suzuki enrichment clinician in the Midwest.
Despite a range of stages and spaces Jess has traversed, the music of Long Time Exhaling bares the intimacy of a letter to a friend, noting each day’s particulars—the way a knife cuts through butter, the absence of a beloved’s jacket. At times playful, at times immersed in longing, the album is fiercely hopeful and deeply communal. “If all the world is a motherless child, we will fill up every glass,” Jess sings in the album’s title track. “We will sing to all our fears as the years go on to pass and we’ll wake up taller than the questions we have asked.”
For someone who has spent more than ten years collaborating with and supporting other artists, it’s not surprising that this debut album inspired new connections. The project started out as just a song or two recorded in the studio of free jazz percussionist, Bill Harris (Four Letter Words, Bowlcut), who also provided percussion. Then it was one more song, and then another, until a full album was on the horizon. The need for a bass brought in Aaron Smith (The Wandering Boys, Sunnyside Up, Growler), and the three found a groove. The result was Long Time Exhaling, a mix of alt-folk, original old-time-inspired instrumentals, and modern balladry released under Jess McIntosh.
In the spirit of change, the evolving collaboration has since taken on the name Joybird, a name for music that dreams and heightens and travels, music that lands with gentle force to disrupt the day, to make you pause and reflect.
“The greatest things that come from music are connection, gratitude and grounding—maybe some pot-stirring or feather-ruffling, too,” says Jess. “I hope our music takes people there.”

Facebook comments:

Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com