A Day In The Country

A Day In The Country

The Brothers Goforth, Weepin' Willows, Gin Palace Jesters, The Lawrence Peters Outfit, Bucktown Aces, Tangleweed, Golden Horse Ranch Band, Cpt. Captain, Poor Elvis, Northside Southpaws, Jonas Friddle & The Majority, Al Scorch

Sun, June 24, 2012

Doors: 1:00 pm / Show: 2:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10.00

Tickets at the Door

A Day In The Country
A Day In The Country
Don’t miss this day of country music, bbq, and homemade pie, at Chicago’s friendliest music and drinkin’ joint.

Featuring beers by Lagunitas, food from Honky Tonk BBQ and Bang Bang Pie, and cold brew coffee from Metropolis.

Front porch 2pm
2 to 2:30- Michelle & Corbin Ferry Road
2:40 to 3:10- Al Scorch’s Country Soul Ensemble
3:20 to 3:50- The Mountainaires
4 to 4:30- Los Gallos

Backroom 4:30pm
4:30 to 5- Cropduster4
5:15 to 5:45- Lonesome Still
6 to 6:30- Golden Horse Ranch Band
6:45 to 7:15- The Saluda Moonlighters (Bailey Dee with an all-star country band!)
7:30 to 8- Lawrence Peters Outfit
8:15 to 9:15- Cactus Blossoms
9:30 to 10- Three Blue Teardrops
10:15 to 10:45- Hodie Snitch
The Brothers Goforth
The Brothers Goforth
Weepin' Willows
Weepin' Willows
The Weepin' Willows are Chicago's own Patsy Cline cover band.

Led by singer Natalie Jose, the band formed in late 2009 and has been entertaining audiences with Patsy's extensive and varied songbook ever since.

With instrumentation featuring lead guitar, pedal steel, piano, drums, and upright bass, we perform it all — from familiar ballads such as "Crazy" and "She's Got You" to the upbeat honky tonk and rockabilly stomps of "Seven Lonely Days" and "Stupid Cupid."
Gin Palace Jesters
Gin Palace Jesters
"Chicago's original honky-tonk fools," the Gin Palace Jesters are purveyors of the finest in hard hitting hillbilly Honky-tonk, Country Boogie and Western Swing . Infused with a deep and sincere fondness for all traditional American musical styles, the sound of the Gin Palace Jesters could best be described as being akin to the sounds of Country Music's "Golden" age. Although a portion of their live performances come from their vast catalog of the Hillbilly & Country Hit Parade, these boys are not mere followers or imitators. They also posses the talent of 3 songwriters performing original novelty numbers, heartfelt love songs, honky-tonk weepers, drinking songs and dark ballads. Delivering 3 and 4 part country harmony, the Gin Palace Jesters prove that authentic country and cowboy music can still hold validity in both traditional songs as well as brand new originals. The Gin Palace Jesters are a true authentic American band often seen holding court where the thrones are bar stools, the lights are made of neon, the holy spirits are served on the rocks, and Hank Williams is King.
The Lawrence Peters Outfit
The Lawrence Peters Outfit
Two time winners of the “Best Country And Western Entertainer” (Chicago Music Awards), The Lawrence Peters Outfit, play un-ruined country music, a term Lawrence coined to describe the band’s original, deep-rooted, honky tonk sound. Best known for his lead vocal on "The Old Black Hen", for the watershed Songs: Ohia- Magnolia Electric Company album, Peters leads the "Outfit" through his own finely crafted originals, and cherry-picked classics. The band is a super-group of Chi-Town pickers, including Matt Gandurski on lead guitar, Dave Sisson on rhythm guitar and harmonies, and Josh Piet on upright bass.
Bucktown Aces
Tangleweed
Tangleweed
For generations, practitioners of that uniquely American art form known variously as old-time or string-band music – progenitor of country, precursor to bluegrass – have labored in obscurity, their talents unrecognized, their provenance maligned. The men of Tangleweed are proud to uphold that tradition.

Their personal histories, while colorful, bear witness to the manifold hardships and hard-scrabble existences so commonly borne by folk artists. Only one was educated on the Continent. Most were forced to leave college after graduation.

Like most such groups, Tangleweed typically performs at drinking establishments and other communal gathering places, where ordinary people come to wash away the trials and tribulations of their workaday lives. Such venues are far removed from the niceties of the concert hall. Yet they testify to the formative influence that context can exert on performance style. How easily does the plaintive keening of Tangleweed's vocal harmonies rise above the whine of milk frothers and espresso machines. How cleanly do their finger-picked melodies cut through the din of mobile telephones and personal computing devices.

Tangleweed’s repertoire, which encompasses traditional fiddle tunes, African-American blues, rags, and stomps, was born in the rich soil of the rural agrarian South. Unlettered and without formal training, its originators gave rise to a deeply expressive musical idiom that spoke for and to a vast, poverty-stricken community of Euro- and African-Americans, for whom such music functioned first and foremost as an accompaniment to social dance. Tangleweed is proud to claim this rich cultural legacy, without in any way sharing in it.

Relieved of the burden of authenticity, unencumbered by troublesome notions of historical accuracy or, indeed, of personal accountability, the men of Tangleweed are free to pursue their own startlingly original interpretive impulses. So does a great tradition reinvent itself, often beyond all recognition.
Golden Horse Ranch Band
Golden Horse Ranch Band
The Golden Horse Square Dance Band was founded in 2000 by Annie Coleman and Anthony Burton. Annie grew up calling square dancing at her families resort (The Golden Horse Ranch. www.goldenhorseranch.com). The Golden Horse Ranch Band's 5 part harmonies and good time stomping cowboy style is not to be missed. This 7 piece ensemble features mandolin, fiddle, upright bass, banjo, guitar, snare drum/washboard, and the occasional bassoon, played by a stellar group of musicians from a cross section of Chicago bands, such as Reds and Blue, Palliard, the Lawrence Peters Outfit, The 1900's, Tangleweed, and everyone's favorite marching band, Mucca Pazza.
Cpt. Captain
Cpt. Captain
Poor Elvis
Poor Elvis
Poor Elvis is Andrew Francis & Pamela Maurer, a Chicago-based duo that play hot-rockin', ear-splittin' original Rhythm & Revival music on guitar, washboard, mouth-harp, and ukulele.
Northside Southpaws
Northside Southpaws
Based in Chicago, The Northside Southpaws are an entirely unique, all-left-handed mandolin/guitar duo who perform high-energy string ragtime, old-time country, "proto-grass", and turn-of-the-century waltzes on left-handed resonator instruments. 
On their debut cd, STOMP GLIDE WOBBLE (2008), duo partners John Hasbrouck (mandolin) and Matt Gandurski (guitar) crank out their interpretations of classic string band tunes from the 1920s and '30s by such acts as The Mississippi Mud Steppers, The Scottdale String Band, Gid Tanner & The Skillet Lickers, and The Three Stripped Gears.
Mandolin Magazine called STOMP GLIDE WOBBLE "...brilliant...one of the best mandolin CDs of the year, filled with an unspoiled sound and infectious enthusiasm that will win over fans from bluegrass, jazz and swing, blues and other styles." (Spring, 2008).
Sing Out! magazine said "This much anticipated CD by the Northside Southpaws was well worth the wait. (STOMP GLIDE WOBBLE) features the pair on a fascinating mixture of archaic ragtime and hillbilly, early jazz and blues, proto-grass and other string band material played with an unspoiled, back-porch fluency that skips the pyrotechnics and possesses an enthusiasm that's bound to perk a listener's ears." (September, 2008).
John Hasbrouck's debut solo fingerstyle guitar CD, ICE CREAM, was cited by ACOUSTIC GUITAR as one of the "Top CDs of 2002". John teaches guitar and mandolin privately and is on staff at The Old Town School of Folk Music in Chicago.
Matt Gandurski is an accomplished songwriter and fingerstyle guitarist with several solo releases to his credit. He teaches guitar at The Beverly Arts Center on Chicago's south side and is an in-demand lead player on Chicago's country music scene.
Jonas Friddle & The Majority
Jonas Friddle & The Majority
Jonas Friddle and the Majority is a new Chicago-based “orchestral folk” group with a big sound. The seven-piece band is comprised of a string section, brass, organ, banjo and drums, and combines a full orchestral sound with driving rhythms for a powerful result. Each member of the Majority boasts a strong personal music career with close ties to Chicago’s Old Town School of Folk Music, where the band formed.

Jonas Friddle’s arrangements and songwriting are heavily rooted in traditional American music. His passion for old-time style banjo from his native North Carolina leads to rhythmic and rolling compositions. At the same time the founder of The Barehand Jugband pulls from the raucous sounds of 1920’s blues and string bands. Following the example of new folk groups like Crooked Still, Abigail Washburn and Old Crow Medicine Show, Jonas looks for a new take on an old sound.
Al Scorch
Al Scorch
Stormy, husky, brawling, City of Big Shoulders.” – from “Chicago” by Carl Sandburg

Al Scorch grew up in Chicago, with its storied history of corrupt power at the top and righteous fighters and big dreamers at the bottom. From the town that gave the world characters like Studs Terkel, Upton Sinclair, and the anarchists in Bughouse Square, Scorch adds his voice to the choir with the enthusiasm and charisma of a Maxwell Street preacher. He eyes the prize of that ever-elusive promised land that’s worth scrapping for, wherever or whatever it may be. With a stentorian bullhorn of a voice, he exhorts, not with a holy book in his hand, but a banjo and guitar. He’s a messenger and a conduit, a believer that a soul-stirring song will march you forward.

Balanced on wedges of punk, old-time string band, American and European folk, and soulful balladry, Al is an entertainer, road warrior, storyteller, and one helluva musician. His second album and Bloodshot debut Circle Round the Signs is built on a sonic framework sharing an intersection with the Bad Livers’ lawless next-gen take on traditional country & bluegrass, and Black Flag’s burn-it-all-down revolt and breakneck tempos. From the train-hopping tale of “Pennsylvania Turnpike” - updating steel rails to concrete ribbons - to the shout-along, late-night lament of “Insomnia” (“I toss and I turn in my bed every night/ I'm sober but my mind’s as high as a kite”), the aural dexterity is thrilling.

Woody Guthrie’s “Slipknot” gets a complex, Western swing cum prog-grass treatment, led by the angular fiddling of Felipe Tobar, that would make acoustic thrash godfathers Split Lip Rayfield grin demonically. And “Want One” blazes down the dirt track with a Stanley Brothers fireball energy driven by Scorch’s clawhammer banjoing, and the it’s-safe-to-laugh-now adventure of meeting an intensely inebriated fan while busking across the country.

But Scorch is far more than lightning for lightning’s sake. Through 10 songs of high wire musicianship, debilitating despair, wild-eyed hope, and sharp-elbowed views of social (in)justice, he deftly maintains a balance of precise touch and texture, pop catchiness and frenetic intensity. That Minutemen inspired “jam econo” vibe embracing the freedom of art and community as long as you’re working hard and bringing your friends along for the ride?… Yeah, that’s here too.

He shows a keen ear for the Mekons’ trans-Atlantic roots and marries it to the Avett Brothers’ big stage sound on “Lost At Sea.” Likewise, there is depth in the song’s lyrics during the cliffhanging, real-life narrative of a best friend almost dying when the HMS Bounty sank in Hurricane Sandy: “When I heard of the wreck my heart left my chest/ tears came rolling down/ the same sun shone through the window/ I thought of a world without you around”

DIY show shakedowns parallel a down-and-out-on-Clout-Street message (“Every bossman is on another bossman’s take/ There ain't no free man except the one you make”) on the vaudeville-via-Eastern European klezmer door-kicker “Everybody Out.” With its bittersweet imagery and mournful harmonies, “Lonesome Low” goes beyond the blue grass and into the deep woods. While the elegiac french horn in “Poverty Draft” wouldn’t sound out of place if it was played in a WWI trench, nor would its message of the poor being the tools of war (“The fight for freedom pays more than minimum wage”).

A punk rock banjo-wielding John Prine or Billy Bragg, Al Scorch writes for the everyperson. Through his acrobatically poetic politics, hopeful tales of love lost (“Love After Death”), or cathartic takes on urban chaos (“City Lullaby”), he pens rowdy campfire stories, calls for action, and draws the epic from the ordinary. Celebrate, right a wrong, or find your path and go for it. It's heavy shit, but so is life.

Facebook comments:

Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com