The Hideout Block Party & Onion A.V. Fest Friday 9/5/14 5:00 & Saturday 9/6/14 1:00

The Hideout Block Party & Onion A.V. Fest Friday 9/5/14 5:00 & Saturday 9/6/14 1:00

FRIDAY:, Death Cab for Cutie, Hamilton Leithauser, The Handsome Family, Bad Luck Jonathan, SATURDAY:, The War On Drugs, The Dismemberment Plan, funky METERS, Mac DeMarco, Sylvan Esso, Valerie June, Empires, Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra

Fri, September 5, 2014

5:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$39.00 - $65.00

A portion of service fees go to the charities. No refunds, exchanges, and all tickets are nontransferable. Tickets are only available online here. You will exchange your ticket for a wristband. Re-entry is permitted with wristband only. Wristband must be on your right wrist. Wristbands that are lost, stolen, tampered with or confiscated will not be replaced. Don't remove your wristband until you leave the Block Party on Saturday. All event information, including line-up, is subject to change. 10 and under no ticket needed. All patrons subject to search. Please do not bring: Knives / Weapons Etc. - Chains - Blankets - Outside Food & Beverage - Camelbacks Bota Bags - Tents - Flags - Chairs - Video Cameras - Audio Recording Devices - Pets - Drugs & Drug Paraphernalia Fireworks. No instruments allowed on the grounds except those being used by participating musicians. Concert will be held rain or shine. No Will Call Ticketing Available.

Hideout Block Party / Onion & A.V. Fest
Hideout Block Party / Onion & A.V. Fest
The Hideout Block Party and the Onion & A.V. Fest combine forces once again for one big festival this year!

The Hideout (Chicago’s finest source for live music) & The A.V. Club (the arts-and-entertainment wing of The Onion, America’s Finest News Source) and have combined forces to present one terrific festival this year just outside the Hideout, at 1354 W. Wabansia St.

Two-day passes are on-sale now with limited early-bird passes priced at $55 plus fees; when those are gone, two-day passes will increase to $65 & $75 plus fees.

A portion of every ticket sold will benefit a variety of Chicago charities, including Rock For Kids. Single-day tickets will go on sale later this summer.

The Hideout celebrated its 17th Block Party last year featuring headliners Neko Case, Mavis Staples and Young the Giant.

The Hideout Block Party has always prided itself on being a low-stress, family-friendly festival, and that tradition will continue this year. Food and drink will of course be available, along with a kids area, a bike valet, and much more.

Friday:
Death Cab For Cutie - 8:30
Hamilton Leithauser - 7:15
The Handsome Family - 6:20
Bad Luck Jonathan ft. Jon Langford - 5:30

Saturday:
The War on Drugs - 8:45
The Dismemberment Plan - 7:30
funky METERS - 6:30
Mac DeMarco - 5:15
Sylvan Esso - 4:00
Valerie June - 3:00
Empires - 2:00
Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra - 1:30
Death Cab for Cutie
Death Cab for Cutie
By their seventh studio album, many bands are running out of creative steam and original ideas. But in the case of Death Cab for Cutie, nothing could be further from the truth.Codes and Keys is singular in the quartet's catalog when it comes to sonic exploration and lyrical ambition. If anything, the band has never sounded more excited to experiment with textures, words, sounds and even the process of recording itself.

Death Cab created Codes and Keys in studios up and down the West Coast, in short bursts over a period of seven months. These studios included Sound City in Van Nuys, California (where the band recorded The Twilight Saga: New Moon single "Meet Me on the Equinox"), The Warehouse in Vancouver, drummer Jason McGerr's own Two Sticks Audio and Tiny Telephone in San Francisco. In between these ten-day or two-week recording sessions, they would put the songs aside and let them "gestate," bassist Nick Harmer says.

It's obvious that the members of Death Cab for Cutie are still each other's biggest fans. More important, they genuinely enjoy making music with each other and being in a band together. Their only motivation is to create music they like - and to impress and satisfy each other. Theirs might not be a controversial rock & roll story - but it is one rooted in stable, supportive brotherhood.

"We left college and spent years in a van together, and we've spent all of this time learning from one another and growing emotionally and otherwise over the years," Harmer says. "The fabric of our relationships is very complex and certainly something that is very important to me, and probably to everyone in the band. We are a support network for each other; we are so much more than four guys who get together and play music."
Hamilton Leithauser
Hamilton Leithauser
Hamilton Leithauser announces his debut album Black Hours - inaugurating a new chapter in an already remarkable career from The Walkmen front man - out June 3rd via Ribbon Music. The album brings Leithauser full circle and then some, from lonely midwinter piano-and-vocals sessions, to a loud, live Rock n Roll group and back again. Featuring Leithauser with a slew of talented collaborators including Rostam Batmanglij (Vampire Weekend), Paul Maroon (The Walkmen), Amber Coffman (Dirty Projectors), Morgan Henderson (Fleet Foxes) and Richard Swift (The Shins/solo), the album showcases Leithauser at his most passionate, personal and free.
The Handsome Family
The Handsome Family
Enter the dark forest of The Handsome Family and let the beautiful branches surround you. This is haunting music in the most wonderful way— brilliant, emotionally-charged and totally unique. May, 2013 brings the release of The Handsome Family’s Wilderness, a record about animals (frogs, flies, wildebeest, octopuses, lizards…), but in lyricist Rennie Sparks’ hands the wonders of nature are intertwined with true stories of Stephen Foster’s death in a Bowery flophouse, General Custer’s shiny boots as he lay dead on a Montana prairie and the capture of Mary Sweeney, the Wisconsin Window Smasher of 1896. There are also tall tales of the octopus’s hypnotic sea-dance, the frenzied mayhem of a town afflicted by a golden lizard’s bite and an enormous mansion full of screeching owls. Musically you’ll hear everything from parlor ballads to overdriven guitars, trilling mandolin and clawhammer banjo, but also beautiful bells, intricate seven-part harmonies, pedal steel and elemental rock ’n roll.
The Handsome Family is a 20-year songwriting collaboration between husband and wife, Brett (music) and Rennie Sparks (words). Their lyrics and music are very intense, highly descriptive and full of meticulously-researched narrative and exhilerating musical re-imaginings of everything from Appalacian holler, psychedelic rock, Tin Pan Alley and medieval ballad. Of course you don’t have to be a music historian to love these songs. They are full of romantic longing for nature’s mysterious beauty and the tiny wonders of everyday life. They pair sweet melody with sad harmony, love poetry with dark beats. This is music that makes you shiver and cry, but also makes you happy to be alive.
Bad Luck Jonathan
Bad Luck Jonathan
Jon Langford (Mekons, Skull Orchard. Waco Brothers) has performed at every Hideout Block Party in the 21st Century. This will be the world premiere of his newest “big noisy rock band” which includes members from Skull Orchard to Whiskeytown.
The War On Drugs
The War On Drugs
Philedelphia's the War on Drugs reside at the blurred edges of American music: overexposing studio limitations, piling tape upon tape to maximum density, and then -- with each song -- they pull off the scaffolding to reveal what sticks, keeping only what's absolutely necessary and dig into what sounds like the best kind of fucked up. As on their 2008 debut, Wagonwheel Blues, central member Adam Granduciel takes small moments occurring over multiple tapes and multiple song versions, and puts every last drop of trust in his own keen instinct of momentum.

That's not to overshadow the sharp, personal songwriting at play here. There are certainly cues taken from our very best American bards (Dylan, Petty, Springsteen). Yet, The War on Drugs are wise enough to also implode those cues or send themselves into outer space when the moment calls for it. The driving organ riff that pushes "Baby Missiles," from the band's 2010 epic EP Future Weather, may well be inspired by a fever dream of Springsteen rather than any particular song in his catalogue. And the endless layers of guitar melody and atmospherics of "Comin' Through," also from Future Weather, rather than add weight to the vessel, only work to fill its sails with warmer and warmer winds.

It’s been over two years since The War On Drugs‘ critically praised album, Slave Ambient, came out and the Philadelphia band’s newest offering, Lost In The Dream is now out worldwide.

Setting up shop along the East Coast in Philadelphia, North Carolina, New York, and New Jersey, Adam Granduciel of TWOD somehow found time to record the new album between two years of constant touring. Lost In The Dream is a familiar kick in the gut reminding listeners what music is supposed to sound like, making you want to run Rocky-style through the streets (or at least us anyways).

Critics praise the new album:
“the band’s most lustrous, intricately detailed, and beautifully rendered record to date” - Pitchfork | Best New Music

“If Slave Ambient represented a breakthrough, this one is an out-and-out star-maker that should rank among the year’s best albums” - SPIN | 9/10

“Adam Granduciel’s impassioned songs stop short of lighters- aloft choruses, twisting buffed-up sounds into exquisite shapes” - The Guardian | ★★★★
The Dismemberment Plan
The Dismemberment Plan
In 2003, if you told the members of The Dismemberment Plan that ten years later they would not only be releasing a new album, but their best record to date, there's no way they would have believed you. Since forming in Washington, D.C. in 1993, the band has released four highly acclaimed full-lengths, toured the world many times over, and become one of the most well respected—and indefinable—acts in indie rock. But the past decade has seen their members exploring other areas both inside and outside of music, and even embracing adulthood. However, along the way something funny happened: They reunited three years ago to play some shows to support the reissue of 1999's Emergency & I, and realized their most potent magic had yet to be bottled.
"We never psyched ourselves out and thought, 'NOW we're making a Plan record," explains guitarist Jason Caddell. "It was more like stay calm and play on," he continues with a laugh. These sessions between the band—which also includes guitarist/vocalist Travis Morrison, bassist Eric Axelson and drummer Joe Easley—resulted in a collection of songs that are inspired because they weren't burdened by any expectations, allowing them to retain the fire of their nascent recordings while entering a fresh sonic aura. "We weren't going to get anything good unless we could trick ourselves into staying in that place where it was creativity for its own sake," Morrison elaborates. "It was a real blessing and opportunity to be in that space again without thinking we had a product to deliver."

To be fair, The Dismemberment Plan never thought of their music as a commodity, despite the fact that they have been handpicked to tour with Pearl Jam and shared the stage with peers Death Cab For Cutie on the co-headlining Death And Dismemberment Tour, among other career milestones. "Our goals have always been more abstract than sales and statistics," Caddell explains. That statement is confirmed by the fact that in the years since their hiatus the members have gone on to thrive in their respective creative and intellectual fields while still keeping music an active presence in their lives.
funky METERS
funky METERS
In their 31-year history, The Meters have grooved their way around the globe. They have toured with such talents as The Rolling Stones, and have been a studio band for such diverse artists as Dr. John, Paul McCartney, Robert Palmer, and Patti Labelle.

Considered by many to be the founding fathers of funk, The Meters created a unique sound that lasted through the sixties and seventies and was reborn in the late eighties. Their trademark sound blends funk, blues, and dance grooves with a New Orleans vibe.
Mac DeMarco
Mac DeMarco
"As I'm getting older, chip up on my shoulder…" is the opening line from Mac DeMarco's second full-length LP Salad Days, the follow up to 2012's lauded Mac DeMarco 2. Amongst that familiar croon and lilting guitar, that initial line from the title track sets the tone for an LP of a maturing singer/songwriter/producer. Someone strangely self-aware of the positives and negatives of their current situation at the ripe old age of 23.

Written and recorded around a relentless touring schedule, Salad Days gives the listener a very personal insight into what it's all about to be Mac amidst the craziness of a rising career in a very public format. The lead single, "Passing Out Pieces," set to huge overdriven organ chords, contains lines like "…never been reluctant to share, passing out pieces of me…" Clearly, this isn't the same record that breezily gave us "Dreamin" and "Ode to Viceroy," but the result of what comes from their success. "Chamber of Reflection," a track featuring icy synth stabs and soulful crooning, wouldn't be out of place on a fantasy Shuggie Otis and Prince collaboration. Standout tracks like these show Mac's widening sound, whether insights into future directions or even just welcome one-off forays into new territory.

Still, this is musically, lyrically and melodically good old Mac DeMarco, through and through. The crisp John Lennon/Phil Spector era homegrown lush production that could have come off Geoff Emerick's mixing board in 1972 with that peculiar Mac touch that's completely right now is still present. "Brother," a complete future classic, is Mac at his most soulful and easygoing but with that distinct weirdness and bite that can only come from Mr. DeMarco. "Treat Her Better" is rife with Mac-isms, heavily chorused slinky lead guitar, swooning vocal melodies, effortless chords that come along only after years of effort, and the other elements seriously lacking in independent music: sentiment and heartfelt sincerity.

We're only in Part 2 1/2 (one EP and two LP's in) of Mac's career. As you read this and as you hear the album on April Fool's Day of this year, he'll probably be on tour, or preparing for one… or maybe already writing new music. A relentless work ethic is something to be admired in today's indie music scene, but when it's of the quality Mac is giving us time and time again, it starts to turn from admiration to awe.
Sylvan Esso
Sylvan Esso
Sylvan Esso was not meant to be a band. Rather, Amelia Meath had written a song called "Play It Right" and sung it with her trio Mountain Man. She'd met Nick Sanborn, an electronic producer working under the name Made of Oak, in passing on a shared bill in a small club somewhere. She asked him to scramble it, to render her work his way. He did the obligatory remix, but he sensed that there was something more important here than a one-time handoff: Of all the songs Sanborn had ever recast, this was the first time he felt he'd added to the raw material without subtracting from it, as though, across the unseen wires of online file exchange, he'd found his new collaborator without even looking.

Meath felt it, too. Schedules aligned. Moves were made. And as 2012 slipped into 2013, Sanborn and Meath reconvened in the unlikely artistic hub of Durham, N.C., a former manufacturing town with cheap rent and good food. Sylvan Esso became a band. A year later, their self-titled debut—a collection of vivid addictions concerning suffering and love, darkness and deliverance—arrives as a necessary pop balm, an album stuffed with songs that don't suffer the longstanding complications of that term.

These 10 tunes were realized and recorded in Sanborn's Durham bedroom during the last year, an impressive feat considering the layers of activity and effects that populate them—the dizzyingly crisscrossed harmonies of "Play it Right," the gorgeously incongruous elements of "Wolf," the surreptitiously minimalist momentum of "HSKT." Sanborn's production is fully modern and wonderfully active. He enlists obliterating dubstep stutters and crisp electropop pulses, hazy electrostatic breezes and epinephrine dancefloor turnarounds.

When Meath and Sanborn talk about Sylvan Esso, they come back to context—to how, before this project, they felt that their solo endeavors often felt short of it, as if they were lacking a crucial component. That is no longer a concern. When Meath sings to Sanborn a melody that she's conjured and captured, he almost instinctively knows how to respond. And when he delivers to her the backbone of a wordless beat, she adds lyrical bait where he'd only seen white space. Sylvan Esso represents the fulfillment of their fortuitous encounter by, once again, linking parts that too often come stripped of their counterparts. Here, motion comes with melody. Words come with ideas. And above all, pop comes back with candor.
Valerie June
Valerie June
"It's been a long night if that's what happened," Valerie June laughs when asked about her seemingly overnight breakout in the UK. By the time she released her debut album, 'Pushin' Against A Stone,' the Tennessee native had already performed on Later… with Jools Holland, sung a stunning duet with Eric Church at the ACM Awards, toured with Jake Bugg, graced spreads in top music and fashion magazines, and earned some of the year's most glowing reviews. But June traveled a long road to the remarkable moment at which she now finds herself.

"I feel like my whole life I've always had a stone I've been pushing," she says, explaining the record's title. "Some days it's a good thing to have, like a best friend, and sometimes it's your worst enemy. In the case of this record, I had so many friends helping me move the stone."

Those friends include the album's producers, Kevin Augunas (Edward Sharpe, Florence + The Machine), Dan Auerbach, and Peter Sabak, along with an all-star cast of fellow musicians ranging from Booker T. Jones and Jimbo Mathus to some of Hungary's top session players. Recorded at Easy Eye in Nashville, Fairfax Recording in Van Nuys, CA, and Studio H in Budapest, the album is a showcase for June's astonishing and singular sound, a blend of rural roots and country that bridges Alan Lomax's acoustic field recordings with biting, electric indie-blues.
Empires
Empires
Empires have emerged from the deep freeze of Chicago with a collection of tunes imbued with a thick-skinned Midwestern charm. “Orphan” – the band’s upcoming album on Chop Shop / Island Records has producer John Congleton (St. Vincent, The Black Angels, Explosions in the Sky) at the helm, perfectly capturing a band in their truest form. Empires are out on the road this winter & spring – with stops at SXSW and various festivals – introducing songs from the new album, including the debut track ‘How Good Does It Feel’.
Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra
Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra
The Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra returns to the Hideout Block-Party. Set time TBA so stay tuned!

Whether you can shred or you've never played a note, you are needed--even small children have participated! All string instruments and some other sound-generators allowed, amps/power strip/extension cords preferred, but an acoustic instrument or 2 is ok. Past Guitarkestras have been bonafide spiritual sonic happenings in NY, at the Hyde Park Art Center, Empty Bottle, etc that i loosely conduct into "E" infinity, with up to 70 guitarists! So invite any friends/acquaintances to play too...!

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com