Hideout Block Party : Andrew Bird, Mavis Staples, Booker T. Jones

Hideout Block Party : Andrew Bird, Mavis Staples, Booker T. Jones

Jon Langford & The Burlington Welsh Male Chorus, Booker T. Jones, The Eternals, White Mystery, Kids These Days, Dosh, Opera-Matic, Chances Dances, Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra

Sat, September 24, 2011

12:00 pm (event ends at 10:00 pm)

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

ONLINE SALES ARE OVER - TICKETS ARE $35 AT THE DOOR AND ARE CASH ONLY.

Doors @ 12pm | Guitarkestra @ 12:15 | White Mystery @ 1:00 | Kids These Days @ 1:45 | The Eternals @ 2:30 | Booker T. Jones @ 3:30 | Jon Langford @ 4:45 | Mavis Staples @ 6:00 | Dosh @ 7:25 | Andrew Bird @ 8:00 |Chances Dances @ 9:30 | Opera-Matic all day long!

General Rules & Regulations:

All ages - 10 and under no ticket needed. - Rain or shine. - No refunds or exchanges. - All patrons subject to search. - Photo ID required for all will call or guest list ticket pick-ups. - Line up and set times subject to change.

Please do not bring: Instruments - Knives / Weapons Etc. - Chains - Blankets - Outside Food & Beverage - Camelbacks Bota Bags - Tents - Flags - Chairs - Video Cameras - Audio Recording Devices - Pets - Drugs & Drug Paraphernalia Fireworks.

Andrew Bird & Friends
Andrew Bird & Friends
Andrew Bird & Friends: a benefit for Rock for Kids’ Andrew Bird scholarship fund at the one and only Hideout.

All proceeds from the event go towards the Andrew Bird Scholarship Fund

Admission also gets you a hand screen-printed poster by Jay Ryan

The scholarship will provide a music student enrolled at ChiArts (Chicago High School for the Arts), who has demonstrated financial need, with private music instruction for one school year. ChiArts is Chicago's first public high school for the arts focused on providing each uniquely gifted students with exceptional preparation in the fine or performing arts.

Rock For Kids and Andrew Bird need your support to make a student's dreams a reality. Please donate today.

Rock For Kids is a fully licensed 501(c)(3) organization which provides free, year-round music lessons to children in need in the Chicago area. Andrew Bird serves on Rock For Kids Honorary Board of Directors
Mavis Staples
Mavis Staples
Mavis Staples is a native Chicagoan who was part of the legendary Staple Singers. She has found new life in recent years with younger musicians: Staples’ new album was produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy: One True Vine comes out June 25, and includes guest appearances by Nick Lowe and the Minnesota band Low.
Jon Langford & The Burlington Welsh Male Chorus
Jon Langford & The Burlington Welsh Male Chorus
Jon Langford’s first solo album, Skull Orchard, was pegged on its release in 1998 as his most Welsh release ever. It was studded with odd consonants for one thing, places like Aberfan, Youghal and Rhondda. Moreover it was nostalgic, both lyrically and musically, for an admittedly imperfect lost Wales. Here tracts of industrial wreckage, port town decadence, minor historical events and figures were recollected fondly but roughly, in Langford’s gruff growls and extravagantly rolled Rs. Even in its original incarnation, backed by assorted Wacos and Mekons, listeners remarked on its folk-ish bent, hearing sea shanties and jigs in its rollicking ditties.

About a decade later, and via a circuitous route, Langford came into contact with the Burlington Welsh Male Chorus, a group based in Toronto but steeped in the group-singing traditions of Langford’s childhood. He was in Toronto recording The Sadies’ live album when he met up with the chorus’ leader, Julian Murray, and soon was deep in beery plots for a touring musical of Moby Dick. Sadly, that never materialized, but Langford did invite the chorus to accompany him at a CeltFest in Chicago in 2007. The songs of Skull Orchard, he decided, were a natural fit. He wrote later, in the book that accompanies this reissue, that “The tunes on the original Skull Orchard album were unknowingly written with a Welsh male choir in mind….They were meant to be sung at international rugby matches in an alternative universe where Tom Jones is the president of a free Welsh republic and Garndiffaith win the Heineken Cup.”

That concert led to a full-scale re-recording of Skull Orchard with the Burlington Welshe Male Chorus as prime backing musicians. It is, at once, a mad idea and a wonderful one. The chorus encases Langford’s Clash/Who/rugby anthem aesthetic in deep caverns of vocal sound, giving even the most jaunty pub rockers (“Green Valleys”) an unexpected gravity. When matched to Langford’s more traditional, Welsh-inspired material, say “Pill Sailor," the multiple voices tip gruff-edged sentimentality into the elegiac. There is, not surprisingly, a convivial whiff of beeriness in all this. The vocal extemporizing at end of “Last Count” is entertaining, but it gives you a sense of just how easily this pack of drunken Welshmen could have gone off the rails.
Booker T. Jones
Booker T. Jones
In Booker T. Jones, the seed was planted early. Not yet a teenager, he was already hauling his stack of newspapers to Phineas Newborn’s front yard where, while folding them for his after-school delivery route, he could listen to the jazz great practice piano. With those notes ringing in his head, he’d set out into the neighborhood, picking up the sound of the streets, the sound of the city, the sound of the citizens—and form new rhythms in his musical mind.

That seed found fertile ground. Wandering to nearby Beale Street, the Harlem of the South, Booker stood outside of Club Handy and listened, tuned to what he was too young to go inside and see: Blind Oscar working the Hammond organ, coaxing new sounds from it like a Delta farmer urging his mule to furrow one more cotton row, to till one more field—getting more from the instrument than can those who don’t know it intimately.

Booker’s journeys continued, hastening on his bike after school to the nearby Satellite Record Shop that opened in his neighborhood in 1960—there, you could listen to records with no obligation to purchase. More seeds planted in rich, receptive soil. Satellite became Stax and two years later, when the success of “Green Onions” would have assured a flourishing studio life for this studious high-schooler, Booker chose a different path, leaving Memphis and the MGs for the University of Indiana. “Who would walk away from a life of stardom, the road, gigs, making money—to go to college?” he asks, and answers himself: “An idiot, or a maverick. Whatever, I was less than popular among my contemporaries for this decision.” It made him a better player, a deeper listener—fecund territory in which the seeds could grow.

“Indiana had 24-hour access to their music library and I was always in there listening,” Booker says. “I listened to a lot of French music, Claude Debussy. I listened to a lot of Russian music, a lot of Wagner and also British music, Italian music—and explored the politics of Europe. The actual music can mean an emotion, they can be one and the same. A piece like ‘Finlandia’ by Sibelius, how does a man write that? His country has been taken and belongs to another country. When an artist can put an emotion in a piece of music and a listener feels the same emotion, then it’s been transferred. That’s just a real true thing that you can’t touch.”

Booker has made real true things all his life. For more than 15 years at Stax, he explored the potential of soul and R&B with the MG’s, both on their own albums and behind vocalists. They were pushing a new direction on their final Stax wax, Melting Pot, grabbing a groove and riding it longer than any pop song, to see where it would go.
The Eternals
The Eternals
Truly warped funk/dub enemble the Eternals combined the talents of Damon Locks (vocals, keyboards, special efx), Wayne Montana (bass, melodica, guitar, keyboards), and Dan Fliegel (percussion, guitar, keyboards). Montana and Locks spent years together in the overlooked Trenchmouth, and Fliegel spent time with members of Tortoise as Tom Ze's backing band during touring. Much like Trenchmouth, but with less emphasis on guitar, the Chicago-based Eternals threw together a number of influences -- from Lee Perry to the Headhunters to Gang of Four -- placing rhythm as the focus with melody and noise not far behind. After releasing two singles on Thrill Jockey in 1999, the Eternals made their full-length debut on DeSoto a year later.
White Mystery
White Mystery
Ferocious red-head brother/sister Chicago duo WHITE MYSTERY featuring MISS ALEX WHITE and FRANCIS SCOTT KEY WHITE return with Blood & Venom, the follow-up to their self-titled, self-released debut LP that earned praise from Sound Opinions, ELLE Magazine Brazil, garage rock legends The Gories, and was named by the Chicago Tribune as a Top Ten Album of 2010. Smoke, flames, alright. On tour now. MTV named White Mystery a Hive Five Sibling Act, The Boston Phoenix awarded White Mystery the “Best New Band in Illinois,” The Chicago Reader voted White Mystery “Best Merch” in Best of Chicago 2011, and Metromix named White Mystery in “Top 20 Summer Street Fest Bands.”
Kids These Days
Kids These Days
Kids These Days comes from Chicago but their music comes from everywhere. With three horns, a rapper, a blues-rock trio and a female singer, KTD blends a wide range of influences -- hip-hop, jazz, soul, blues, and classic rock -- into a unique, fresh sound that breaks boundaries while honoring America’s musical heritage.
Dosh
Dosh
With the flash and efficiency of digital song-making technologies, it can be easy to lose sight of the merits of that which is analog. Martin Dosh, then, has become something of an accidental preservationist, keeping instruments like Rhodes keyboards and an ancient Korg EX 800 sequencer alive by using them in his innovative solo works and collaborations with the likes of Andrew Bird and Bonnie “Prince” Billy.

Over the years, he’s graciously given over rich compositions like “First Impossible” (which became Andrew Bird’s “Not a Robot but a Ghost”) to collaboration, but with Milk Money, his latest solo release, Dosh decided to let his arrangements stand on their own. Blending elements of hip hop, jazz drumming, vocal samples and electronic production, he builds a variety of warm soundscapes. His mixes of piano, percussion, vocals and more are broad, room-filling compositions, created by running the elements of each track through guitar amplifiers simultaneously, creating a “re-amp” effect that allows each song to breathe. The result is a collection of open pieces, like the wonder-tinged “Kisses,” that invite the listener to step inside.

Looping pedals are integral to Dosh’s music, and he uses them here to great effect. With a stage set-up that looks like a fort erected by a kid with only musical instruments for building materials — boxed in on all sides by keyboards, drums and complicated boards of knobs begging to be jiggled — Dosh uses loops to construct his soundscapes solo. The resulting complexity and breadth of his songs is most evident on the record’s closing track, a nearly 25-minute number Dosh composed for a duo performance with Wilco’s Glenn Kotche at the request of the Walker Arts Center in Dosh’s hometown of Minneapolis. Beginning with a single pinging note on the Rhodes, it winds through many cycles, eventually blossoming into an ebullient flurry of sound.

Milk Money is the recording of a vital mind alive with the possibility of what it can create. It brims with a warmth that can’t be digitized. It’s the satisfying, immediate thwack of drumstick again drumhead, the visceral pleasure of a grown-up boy at play inside a musical fort.
Opera-Matic
Opera-Matic
Opera-Matic brings moving visual art to the streets. We activate public spaces for community engagement through people-powered sound, story and interaction. By combining modular design and material repurposing, Opera-Matic weaves together the fantastic and familiar in unexpected places, encouraging culture building and neighborhood participation.
Chances Dances
Chances Dances
A dance party that attempts to bring together the different LGBTIQ communities and cliques across queer Chicago. All gender expressions are welcome.
Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra
Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra
The Plastic Crimewave Vision Celestial Guitarkestra returns to the Hideout Block-Party. Set time TBA so stay tuned!

Whether you can shred or you've never played a note, you are needed--even small children have participated! All string instruments and some other sound-generators allowed, amps/power strip/extension cords preferred, but an acoustic instrument or 2 is ok. Past Guitarkestras have been bonafide spiritual sonic happenings in NY, at the Hyde Park Art Center, Empty Bottle, etc that i loosely conduct into "E" infinity, with up to 70 guitarists! So invite any friends/acquaintances to play too...!

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com