Angela James

Angela James

Thomas Comerford, Matt Clark

Thu, February 7, 2013

9:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$7.00

Tickets Available at the Door

Angela James
Angela James
Singer-songwriter Angela James' music is clearly influenced by the strong voices of country/folk music in the 60s & 70s - Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette, Sammi Smith, Linda Rondstadt, etc., but spacious and often experimental arrangements lend a modern, edgy & brooding feel to her songs. James' debut EP, Down and Out, was released in November of 2012 and received a 4-star review from Time Out Chicago: "In her hands, Americana is something best delivered with care, slowed to a crawl and unspooled gently, yielding dusty, delicate passages that put you in a sleepy honky-tonk... Far from down and out, these songs suggest an artist on the up and up."
She is currently putting the finishing touches on her first full-length record, Way Down Deep, which features collaborators across several different Chicago musical communities and was recorded in three different locations.
For this show she'll be joined by co-producers of the record: Jordan Martins (bass, steel guitar, and lead guitar) & Charles Rumback (drums) with a couple of special guest stars.
Thomas Comerford
Thomas Comerford
On a summer tour in 2012 to promote his first solo LP, Archive + Spiral, Thomas Comerford was puzzling out how to move forward with his follow-up album. He had demos and basic tracks of new songs, and sounds forming in in his head: Bowie, outlaw country, Glenn Campbell pop classicism and 1970s AM radio fare shot through with some first- wave punk dirt. He had the ebb of his baritone, which curled like smoke around the frustrations, passions and temporary triumphs of the characters in his songs. But he needed a place to work and like-minded people to help him build and shape the material.

On that tour, Comerford realized he need look no further than the stage: to his backing band, recent friends Joshua Dumas and Robbie Hamilton. Both were engineers and studio rats working at Pieholden Suite Sound, founded by the late Jay Bennett (whose songwriting and multi- instrumental acumen graced Wilco from 1997 to 2001). Over the course of the trek, the three developed a musical rapport playing together and sharing, listening to and talking about music and recordings they loved.

“For some time, I’d been enamored of studio-bound records like Buckingham/Nicks and All Things Must Pass, records that I’d never tried to emulate,” Comerford says, “but for the new material, I wanted to go down that rabbit hole and see where the songs could go.”

Fans of the burnished, mellow folk grit of the first LP will find much more at work in their headphones this time around. The multilayered music on II called for an intensive and patient approach, and Comerford found himself becoming a better listener and more attentive to arrangements, drawing on Pieholden’s palette of sounds and textures to push each song into a more expanded character and consciousness. “In the studio, I tried out ‘why not?’ ideas with instruments I had never used before: ‘Chrysalis’ got a mellotron; ‘Nashville’ got a ‘chamber country’ string quartet, and
‘Done and Done’ got some Thin Lizzy–inspired harmony guitars.”

Standout tracks are the hazy-sunny “Eternal Return,” whose zooming, lush harmonies brim with bummer lyrics meditating on self-destruction, Richard Hell and Johnny Thunders, though the narrator does cross his heart to “do my best to get out of it / and out from under it.”“Prefer Not To” somehow sounds like David Bowie and Mick Ronson pitching a song to Townes van Zandt, with the guiding sentiment of Melville’s hero Bartleby the Scrivener lashing into a dense, heavy, dramatic coda. There’s also “Nashville,” so named because Comerford wrote it there, after tracing the Hank Williams family saga at the Country Music Hall of Fame. “Nashville” is perhaps the album’s most direct tribute to a single writer: Mickey Newbury, whose elegant work Comerford discovered on that visit to Music City.

With its dark heart and sturdy melodies, II bears the mark of a dedicated career musician immersing himself in songcraft and discovering new possibilities for his music through the studio.
Matt Clark
Matt Clark
Matt Clark (American, b. 1775) is a Chicago-based guitar player and artist, unknown for his work as 1/2 of the psychedelic drone duo White/Light (on Steve Shelley’s Smells Like Records). Clark has performed on Oprah, in Le Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain, and behind the Big Horse Taqueria (R.I.P.), while under contract to Capitol Records and Astralwerks Records and/or under handshake to Honk If You're A Moose Records (R.I.P.). Clark's recent music activities include a month-long sound installation and performance residency at the Museum of “Contemporary” Art Chicago, an afternoon-long performance residency playing Rolling Stones (R.I.P.) songs solo for a conference room full of tax lawyers, and a wayfaring appearance on lap steel guitar with space punks Disappears at Lollapalooza.

Clark’s music is at the forefront, and in the background, of the one-man “Cosmic American Primitive” movement. He is the youngest son of influential rust belt folk-blues ukulelist Weezy Newhard Clark and a brother to all.

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com