Turn to Crime

Turn to Crime

The Sueves, Twin Hits

Sat, February 25, 2017

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10.00

Tickets at the Door

Turn to Crime
Turn to Crime
Turn to Crime exists within its own pocket universe amid the Detroit music scene. Whereas some are beholden to the almost institutional credo of “loud fast rules” while others subscribe to the orthodoxy of established local genres like techno or garage rock, Turn to Crime stubbornly burrow through the ice cracked concrete to mine its own form of sonic magma. Turn to Crime is the singular product of Derek Stanton recorded in his studio and put out on his label. It’s a true example of D.I.Y. and a sui generis recording project that extrudes pop forms through an avant-garde dye.

Recorded over the last year in his basement studio in Detroit’s Southwest, Molten Sound, and released on Stanton’s label Mugg & Bopp, Turn To Crime’s newest Actions is a continuation of 2014’s critically acclaimed debut Can’t Love. That previous album’s tone, which Uncut Magazine called, “kosmische, post-punk and lo-fi electronic noise” that “keeps its sights on the pop hook” is present on Actions but taken to new heights of maximal minimalism. Akin to the more “out-there” eras of a Bowie and Lou Reed, or perhaps a less “out-there” Gary Wilson, Actions takes the raw materials of a pop tune (repetition and hooks) and atomizes them. Unique guitar tunings bump up against minimal electronics while sweetly sung harmonies ricochet in caverns of tape decay.

Opener “This Is What You Wanted”, sounds like the sun rising over a strange planet. The song “Actions” is a stately-paced rumination on the less savory aspects of living in a supposed New Detroit with a matter-of-fact exhortation to “cut off your hands”, while it’s counterpoint “Prince of Slackers” bops like a classic rock song on klonopin – Tom Petty with weird angles and his buckteeth sharpened into fangs. Like Can’t Love‘s widescreen closer (“I Can’t Not Love”), “Feels Right” unfolds like the epic closing song from some wrongfully forgotten 1980’s film. With its sawing synths and skyscraping guitars, “Feels Right” perfectly concludes an album that, over its seven songs, truly feels like a journey. From the ambient opening through the last echoed chords,the seemingly lost art of an album as a complete statement is in full bloom here.

Often with these types of mad genius basement symphonies, the compositions are too studio bound or the genius too mad to recreate in a live setting. With Turn to Crime, Stanton has a willing retinue including local musicians Ian Saylor and Dorian Foerg. This live band is able to both capture the singular beauty ofActions and to experiment with its unique architecture. Now, with two exceptional albums in as many years, Turn to Crime has a formidable battery of songs to soundtrack your next brain melt.
The Sueves
The Sueves
Chicago’s punk underworld has reimagined itself several times over the past twenty years, from the cavorting slime punk damage of the early 2000s, through the fracturing of styles and directions a few years later, it’s all been simmering salaciously for generations now, and for the last few years, only a few really noteworthy band have grasped the raw agitation as well as The Sueves. Rearing their ugliness up through the tropes of plastic flowers and goofy sunglasses, these brave young ravagers are not content to sit idly by as the stench of indifference passes over the masses, always the “least chill” band at the rock’n roll party and that is really a good thing. You can’t just sit still when The Sueves are wielding their wares, both in person and on record, the aggression has to burst out somehow, and although it’s far, far easier to just appeal to the low-hanging fruit dangling at the bottom of the rock’n roll food chain, it’s far more respectable to be the ones who are bleeding and bruised, flipping over the tables & chairs with reckless abandon, every single time.
The Sueves’ core sound echoes back to a time not long ago when you really had to TRY HARD to make your band stand out, pushing the boundaries of the tired “garage rock” trappings into a mutated stump of unpredictable punk splatter. The guitar tone sits somewhere between sadistically strangulated and blisteringly complicated, an ominous bonafide shredding sound that leaves you beaten and beleaguered and gasping for more, even with such serrated hooks dug in so deep. And while their less-than-shocking appearance keeps them hidden within their surroundings, it’s this visceral noise emanating from their sizzling weapons of choice that clearly sets them apart, constantly reminding you of the nastiness that lies within true rock’n roll savagery. The nuances are sickening, the delivery desperate, and that oh-so-impossible tension all tie together with The Sueves on this debut LP to level your expectations and decimate your dreams of a low-key existence.
Twin Hits
Twin Hits

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com