POWOPA!

POWOPA!

Al Scorch, The Fat Babies, Reginald Robinson, Devil In A Woodpile, The Bottlesnakes (St. Louis), The Paulina Hollers, Jake Sanders & Patrick Donley, The Hat Stretchers

Sun, October 16, 2016

1:00 pm

The Hideout

Chicago, IL

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets at the Door

POWOPA!
POWOPA!
POWOPA = Puttin Out WithOut PA

POWOPA is a new all-day festival brought to you from Rick Sherry, one of the biggest driving forces for acoustic music in Chicago. This event is to celebrate the musicians who "put out" without a microphone. The whole day features musicians who will go amp-less to show the power behind pure acoustics!

1-1:45pm THE HAT STRETCHERS (front stage)
1:45-2:30pm JAKE & PATRICK (back stage)
2:30-3:15pm DEVIL IN A WOODPILE (front stage)
3:15-4pm REGINALD ROBINSON (back stage)
4-4:45pm THE PAULINA HOLLERS (front stage)
4:45-5:30pm THE BOTTLESNAKES (back stage)
5:30-6:15pm AL SCORCH (front stage)
6:15-7pm THE FAT BABIES (back stage)
Al Scorch
Al Scorch
Stormy, husky, brawling, City of Big Shoulders.” – from “Chicago” by Carl Sandburg

Al Scorch grew up in Chicago, with its storied history of corrupt power at the top and righteous fighters and big dreamers at the bottom. From the town that gave the world characters like Studs Terkel, Upton Sinclair, and the anarchists in Bughouse Square, Scorch adds his voice to the choir with the enthusiasm and charisma of a Maxwell Street preacher. He eyes the prize of that ever-elusive promised land that’s worth scrapping for, wherever or whatever it may be. With a stentorian bullhorn of a voice, he exhorts, not with a holy book in his hand, but a banjo and guitar. He’s a messenger and a conduit, a believer that a soul-stirring song will march you forward.

Balanced on wedges of punk, old-time string band, American and European folk, and soulful balladry, Al is an entertainer, road warrior, storyteller, and one helluva musician. His second album and Bloodshot debut Circle Round the Signs is built on a sonic framework sharing an intersection with the Bad Livers’ lawless next-gen take on traditional country & bluegrass, and Black Flag’s burn-it-all-down revolt and breakneck tempos. From the train-hopping tale of “Pennsylvania Turnpike” - updating steel rails to concrete ribbons - to the shout-along, late-night lament of “Insomnia” (“I toss and I turn in my bed every night/ I'm sober but my mind’s as high as a kite”), the aural dexterity is thrilling.

Woody Guthrie’s “Slipknot” gets a complex, Western swing cum prog-grass treatment, led by the angular fiddling of Felipe Tobar, that would make acoustic thrash godfathers Split Lip Rayfield grin demonically. And “Want One” blazes down the dirt track with a Stanley Brothers fireball energy driven by Scorch’s clawhammer banjoing, and the it’s-safe-to-laugh-now adventure of meeting an intensely inebriated fan while busking across the country.

But Scorch is far more than lightning for lightning’s sake. Through 10 songs of high wire musicianship, debilitating despair, wild-eyed hope, and sharp-elbowed views of social (in)justice, he deftly maintains a balance of precise touch and texture, pop catchiness and frenetic intensity. That Minutemen inspired “jam econo” vibe embracing the freedom of art and community as long as you’re working hard and bringing your friends along for the ride?… Yeah, that’s here too.

He shows a keen ear for the Mekons’ trans-Atlantic roots and marries it to the Avett Brothers’ big stage sound on “Lost At Sea.” Likewise, there is depth in the song’s lyrics during the cliffhanging, real-life narrative of a best friend almost dying when the HMS Bounty sank in Hurricane Sandy: “When I heard of the wreck my heart left my chest/ tears came rolling down/ the same sun shone through the window/ I thought of a world without you around”

DIY show shakedowns parallel a down-and-out-on-Clout-Street message (“Every bossman is on another bossman’s take/ There ain't no free man except the one you make”) on the vaudeville-via-Eastern European klezmer door-kicker “Everybody Out.” With its bittersweet imagery and mournful harmonies, “Lonesome Low” goes beyond the blue grass and into the deep woods. While the elegiac french horn in “Poverty Draft” wouldn’t sound out of place if it was played in a WWI trench, nor would its message of the poor being the tools of war (“The fight for freedom pays more than minimum wage”).

A punk rock banjo-wielding John Prine or Billy Bragg, Al Scorch writes for the everyperson. Through his acrobatically poetic politics, hopeful tales of love lost (“Love After Death”), or cathartic takes on urban chaos (“City Lullaby”), he pens rowdy campfire stories, calls for action, and draws the epic from the ordinary. Celebrate, right a wrong, or find your path and go for it. It's heavy shit, but so is life.
The Fat Babies
The Fat Babies
The Fat Babies are an eight piece jazz band interpreting classic styles of the 1920s and 30s.

Founded in 2010 by string bass player Beau Sample, its members include Andy Schumm (cornet), John Otto (reeds), Jonathan Doyle (reeds), Dave Bock (trombone), Johnny Donatowicz (banjo and guitar), Paul Asaro (piano), and Alex Hall (drums).
Reginald Robinson
Reginald Robinson
20 years after Reginald Robinson’s emergence as a young, self-taught, against the grain pianist and composer, he has become an internationally recognized pianist, recording artist and educator.

His love for music started in 1984 with his brother Marlando playing Big band jazz records at home and then on to ragtime two years later in 7th grade when a city funded arts program (Urban Gateways) gave an assembly with a small jazz ensemble. The assembly was led by jazz trumpeter Orbert Davis and included in the band other jazz luminaries like Ari Brown. In the middle of the show the group played a sample of Scott Joplin’s “The Entertainer” and after hearing it Reginald decided this was the kind of music he wanted to play. Later that year his parents purchased a small electronic keyboard and the following year a real piano. With his parents not being able to afford him a music education, he began to teach himself how to read and write music. This involved self quizzing from music education books, creating his own piano exercises and studying published music scores and recordings.

1992 marked the year Reginald’s professional music career began. He was introduced by fellow musicians to musician Jon Weber who immediately funded Reginald’s first demo called The Strongman. The demo was later used as part of his 1993 Delmark debut release by the same name.

In 1995 Reginald scored new music for “Each One As She May” a play by Frank Galati and that same year received a nomination for best original music at the Joseph Jefferson. In 2003 his music was used as part of “Intimate Apparel” a play by Lynn Nottage which was nominated for best music director at the Beverly Hills/Hollywood Theatre Awards. In 2004, he was awarded the rare and distinguished John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Award for his innovation in ragtime.

Reginald composed music for an independent film by Zeinabu Irene Davis entitled “Compensation” (2000) and with film producer Barbara Allen on a few works; “Paper Trail” (2005), “Morning Due” (2007) and “Chicago’s Black Metropolis” (2010). Reginald has performed as a soloist internationally and has performed as guest artist with Orbert Davis Chicago Jazz Philharmonic and The Chicago Sinfonietta. In addition he has performed with various smaller ensembles such as: Accessible Contemporary Music, Andrew Bird’s Bowl of Fire, Fulcrum Point and the Arts Center Jazz Ensemble. Reginald occasionally leads his own band The Reginald Robinson Jazztet.
Devil In A Woodpile
Devil In A Woodpile
Devil in a Woodpile, they play blues. They also play country. Ragtime. Hot Jazz. Hillbilly. It's all the same to them. It's all taken from the same deep, muddy well called American Music that existed long before wise guy marketing goons and interweb algorithms decided to categorize and sub-categorize the whole mess.
The Bottlesnakes (St. Louis)
The Bottlesnakes (St. Louis)
Ethan Leinwand is a blues pianist and preservationist. A student of the music's rich history and varied regional styles, Ethan presents personal interpretations of many of the great (and forgotten) old-time barrelhouse masters. He specializes in St. Louis pre-war piano blues, Texas barrelhouse, early Chicago boogie-woogie, and New Orleans rhythm 'n' blues.
Originally from Middletown, CT, Ethan has spent time living in New Orleans, LA and Brooklyn, NY. He moved to St. Louis, MO in the summer of 2014, after a short visit convinced him that, with its thriving blues community and storied music history - particularly on the piano - St. Louis was the ideal place to live and work .

Nick Pence is a slide guitarist and a native to St. Louis. Influenced by a mix of American musicians he most often finds inspiration from the likes of Frank Stokes, Clifford Gibson, Casey Bill Weldon, Tampa Red, Charley Jordan, as well as old time string and jug bands.

Together they bring high energy and low down grooves. Their playing seems to intertwine as if it were one and their singing lays right on top of the other as if they were brothers. It is tried and true when a city tickler and a country picker get together something special is bound to result. This duo is no exception.
The Paulina Hollers
The Paulina Hollers
Paulina Hollers, play Appalchian Stringband music.

Formed by Jim Becker of Califone and Lea Tshilds in 1996 in Chicago, IL.
Jake Sanders & Patrick Donley
Jake Sanders & Patrick Donley
Jake Sanders and Patrick Donley will play songs from the 20’s and 30’s. Ragtime, Waltzes, Polkas, Blues, Boleros and all the weird string music you can imagine.
The Hat Stretchers
The Hat Stretchers
From the urban hollers of Chicago were born The Hat Stretchers! They are a string band trio whose music will place you on the edge of a beat-up porch, as you swing your bare feet to the beat of their bygone sounds. The Hat Stretchers members are veterans of the Chicago acoustic music scene: Rick Cookin’ Sherry (Devil In A Woodpile, Sanctified Grumblers) sings and plays guitar. John Hasbrouck (The Northside Southpaws, Hardscrabble) plays left-handed banjo and mandolin. And Jon Williams (Andrew Bird’s Bowl of Fire, The Chandelier Swingers) plays fiddle...Music with crooked harmonies and foot stompin’ rhythms fueled by moonshine and the music of Charlie Poole, Uncle Dave Macon plus lesser known pioneers of primitive country music. It’s a hillbilly, “hell-yeah” hollerin’ good time!!

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Venue Information:
The Hideout
1354 W. Wabansia Ave
Chicago, IL, 60642
http://www.hideoutchicago.com